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Fall Garden Mums. Hardy or No?

Mum plants are a symbol of fall, with their domes of rich, jewel-tone colors. Mums pop up in gardens centers late in the season and are ubiquitous in fall gardens. To tempt gardeners to purchase these late season bloomers, they are often sold in full bloom. While it is nice to have instant color and even nicer to know exactly what color we are getting, buying flowers in full bloom can mean they are past peak and already declining.

That’s fine, if all you want is a seasonal decoration, but not good if you are hoping for a “hardy” perennial plant.

Why Hardy Mums Don’t Live Through Winter

For mums to be truly hardy, they need time to become established in the ground. Ideally, they are best planted in the spring and allowed to grow in place all season. Unfortunately, the mums for sale in garden centers in the fall have been coddled in nurseries and coaxed to set buds for September blooms. That means they are putting an awful lot of energy into blooming, not growing roots. Planting these out in the garden in late summer or early fall doesn’t guarantee sufficient time for the plants to become established. This is not a problem in warmer climates, where a bit of deadheading will satisfy most mums after bloom, but in areas with sub-zero winters, perennial plants need substantial roots to anchor them into the ground. The repeated freezing and thawing of the soil will heave the plant out of the ground and kill the roots.

How to Protect Fall Planted Mums During Winter

For fall planted mums to have a better chance of survival  in cold areas, you need to give the roots and crown of the plants a little extra protection. First, leave the foliage on the plants until spring. Don’t prune them back after frost has turned them brown.

Then, either mulch the plants heavily or dig, pot and move the plants to a more protected spot in the garden for the winter. If you choose to move the plants, do so before the first hard freeze.

How to Make Sure Your Mums Bloom in Fall

Spring planted mums will have plenty of time for root growth. Many gardeners are surprised that their garden mums start to bloom in mid- to late summer. If you want fall flowers on your mums, you’ll need to pinch the plants back periodically throughout the summer. Start when the plants are about 4-5″ tall and repeat every 2-3 weeks until about mid-July. This will cause the plant to get stocky and bushier and by late summer, it should be covered with flower buds.

Spring planted mums should over-winter reliably in USDA Zones 5 and above, maybe even Zone 4. As with fall planted mums, don’t cut them back until spring and provide some extra winter mulch, to prevent heaving. Established plants shouldn’t be fed after July, so new growth isn’t injured by frost.

Of course, you can always grow mums as annuals. They do provide wonderful fall color and work great at filling in empty spots where summer bloomers have faded. Look for plants with lots of unopened buds, to have blooms well into the fall season.

https://www.thespruce.com/fall-garden-mums-hardy-or-no-1402718

 

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gone-to-groundED.jpg
Home is where the heartbreak
Wraps cold around my bones
~ Beth Orton

Thoroughly enjoyable.

Surprisingly, I found @ least five typos nearer the end; MOST unusual for a British press.

 

solitaire

I’m not sure WHAT I was thinking when I picked this up;
maybe I only read the back of the book-jacket?  NO, that’s unlikely.

Anyway, I’ve never been a sci-fi fan, and this one’s going back to the charity sale.

CDN $37.95!; USA $24.99; Bestseller Sale $5.99

ed. ?/”L

I purchased a wonderful mixed basket from from my wonderful florist that included a Calla.  I actually got three plants/blooms from it, and couldn’t complain that it eclipsed all but one other plant in the pot.  Can’t believe i was still looking @ healthy, burgundy foliage earlier today/yesterday – ‘tho that is supposed to change overnight [November 9-10].

My neighbour assures me they’ll do fine in a refrigerator crisper, so that’s where they’re headed.

For those of you still blessed with gardens:
http://ahealthylifeforme.com/canna-lily-winter-care/
Give the pix a sec to load

I HAD cc’D & pasted the teXt here but it disappeared….

Canna lilies have tender tubers. In warm climates where winter temperatures rarely drop below 40 degrees F, mulching the flower bed would be sufficient to protect them frost and freezing. In most places, like here in Cincinnati where fall and winter temperatures will drop below freezing, canna lilies will need special care to survive cold temperatures. You may also need to store your Dahlias, Gladiolus and other tender weather bulbs and tubers. This technique works for every bulb I have ever stored over the cold winter months.

Before you dig up your tubers you need to think of where you will store them. You can use a box, large bucket or heavy plastic garbage bag and fill it with damp sand, sphagnum peat moss, coarse sawdust or vermiculite particles. I prefer to keep mine in 4′ frames with screen material stapled to the bottom. I like this because it is easy to spray the bulbs and tubers to remove the remaining dirt and it allows air to circulate during storage.

Allow the first fall frost to blacken the foliage of the canna lilies.

You can dig them up as long as the soil is workable and snow or frost hasn’t crusted the soil surface. Start digging 6 inches away from the base of the plant. Use the shovel to loosen the roots. I lightly tap the tuber on the ground to remove any loose soil.

I lay the tubers in my tray and move it into the garage and spray with a hose loosening and removing any additional soil. I allow the tubers to rest and dry over 1-3 days.

Once the bulbs are dried I cover the tubers with peat moss and store them in a cool, dark but slightly moist condition, between 40 and 50 degrees F. I will check the tubers throughout the winter season and if moss is bone dry I will mist the moss lightly with water.
Make sure to label the container or the individual bulb with a permanent marker, you don’t want to be guessing what you are planting come spring time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

i had cc’d and pasted t

 

 

 

hem here but they disappeared.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

assures me I can keep in in a refriderator cripser, and taht’s where thre\y’ll be going!

IDEAL – for those blessed with gardens
http://aheaclthylifeforme.com/canna-lily-winter-care/;
takes a sed to load pix

[TXT0 Canna lilies have tender tubers. In warm climates where winter temperatures rarely drop below 40 degrees F, mulching the flower bed would be sufficient to protect them frost and freezing. In most places, like here in Cincinnati where fall and winter temperatures will drop below freezing, canna lilies will need special care to survive cold temperatures. You may also need to store your Dahlias, Gladiolus and other tender weather bulbs and tubers. This technique works for every bulb I have ever stored over the cold winter months.
Before you dig up your tubers you need to think of where you will store them.  You can use a box, large bucket or heavy plastic garbage bag and fill it with damp sand, sphagnum peat moss, coarse sawdust or vermiculite particles.   I prefer to keep mine in 4′ frames with screen material stapled to the bottom.  I like this because it is easy to spray the bulbs and tubers to remove the remaining dirt and it allows air to circulate during storage.

Allow the first fall frost to blacken the foliage of the canna lilies.
You can dig them up as long as the soil is workable and snow or frost hasn’t crusted the
soil surface.  Start digging  6 inches away from the base of the plant. Use the shovel to loosen the roots.  I lightly tap the tuber on the ground to remove any loose soil.

I lay the tubers in my tray and move it into the garage and spray with a hose loosening and removing any additional soil.  I allow the tubers to rest and dry over 1-3 days.
Once the bulbs are dried I cover the tubers with peat moss and store them in a cool, dark but slightly moist condition, between 40 and 50 degrees F. I will check the tubers throughout the winter season and if moss is bone dry I will mist the moss lightly with water.

Make sure to label the container or the individual bulb with a permanent marker, you don’t want to be guessing what you are planting come spring time.

I’ve been in denial, but right now it is -1C, with a WindChill of -4…

last-timeloved end from start-to-finish

spadina2

That’s Spa-DEE-nah – NOT Spa-DIE-nah

Despite the Shuffle Demons fun song (below),
there is NO HARD ‘I’ sound in Ojibwa
[or Obibway, as it was when i was a kid, circa TImagami].

I’m clearing/re-organizing shelves, and this must’ve been enjoyable or I’d not have kept it.

MY cc is [?/now] cream-coloured;
I have used an ‘enhancement tool’ to attempt to replicate the PHOTOGRAPH.